Should I File Bankruptcy?

Timing is everything when it comes to bankruptcy. Filing too late could mean losing your home to foreclosure or having your wages garnished. Filing too quickly could cause you to miss out on a tax refund or the chance to get better overall terms in your bankruptcy. Knowing when to take action is crucial, and something an experienced lawyer can help you understand.

At Minion & Sherman, our New Jersey bankruptcy attorneys have more than 40 years of combined experience guiding the people of New Jersey through the bankruptcy process. We know that every case is different, so right time to file bankruptcy will vary from person to person. We will take the time to get to know you and your situation so we can give you accurate advice about when the proper time to file would be.

Bankruptcy Is a Personal Decision

Are you asking yourself, "Should I file bankruptcy?" Filing bankruptcy is a major life decision, and one that should not be taken lightly or made in a rush. When you are overwhelmed by debt, it is easy to lose sight of the big picture. Part of our job as bankruptcy lawyers in New Jersey is to help our clients understand the pros and cons of filing right now as opposed to waiting a little while.

Whether you end up filing for Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy, aspects of your life will change. Some of the change will be positive and some will be difficult. For example:

If you choose to retain Minion & Sherman, you can rest assured that your bankruptcy filing will be made at the time that is most appropriate for you. We will be by your side from the beginning of the process to the end, and we will always be available to answer your questions.

Contact an Attorney for Help Filing Bankruptcy in New Jersey

To learn more about the bankruptcy process and whether it may be the right time for you to file, schedule a free consultation at Minion & Sherman by calling 973-559-5791 or toll free 866-915-1839. You can also contact our law firm online.

We are a debt relief agency. We help people file for relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code.